Ana Wieder-Blank

Sharpe-Walentas Studio Program

20 Jay Street, Suite 720

Ana Wieder-Blank works in painting, ceramics, printmaking, and performance to reinterpret ancient mythology from Greece and India, the Torah, and fairy tales through a contemporary lens. She changes the narratives, characters, and morals from these stories to reveal and reframe the derogatory lessons they contain about women, non-white people, and queer love. A self-proclaimed maximalist, Weider-Blank has a thick, broad-stroked, gestural style that is utterly unique amid common contemporary faux-naive painting styles and expresses the heartfelt urgency and sincerity of her practice. In her work she takes up themes including outsider marginalization, queer sexuality, environmental concerns, and rape and consent—so common to art history and myriad mythologies. She weaves these ancient themes into contemporary politics, referencing current events and well-known political characters to connect them to our recurring and founding myths.

About Sharpe-Walentas Studio Program

The Sharpe-Walentas Studio Program awards rent-free non-living studio space to 17 visual artists for year-long residencies in DUMBO, Brooklyn. Its mission is to provide working studio space and community for artists. Artists are selected annually based on merit from a competitive pool of applicants by a professional jury comprised of artists and members of the SWSP Artists Advisory Committee.

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Ana Wieder-Blank works in painting, ceramics, printmaking, and performance to reinterpret ancient mythology from Greece and India, the Torah, and fairy tales through a contemporary lens. She changes the narratives, characters, and morals from these stories to reveal and reframe the derogatory lessons they contain about women, non-white people, and queer love. A self-proclaimed maximalist, Weider-Blank has a thick, broad-stroked, gestural style that is utterly unique amid common contemporary faux-naive painting styles and expresses the heartfelt urgency and sincerity of her practice. In her work she takes up themes including outsider marginalization, queer sexuality, environmental concerns, and rape and consent—so common to art history and myriad mythologies. She weaves these ancient themes into contemporary politics, referencing current events and well-known political characters to connect them to our recurring and founding myths.