Kimo Nelson

Sharpe-Walentas Studio Program

20 Jay Street, Suite 720

Kimo Nelson paints landscapes of remarkable geological features such as canyons and icebergs with methods that mimic their own formation. He layers, distresses, and removes multiple layers of paint in ways that imitate the erosion and accumulation that shape the rippling surfaces of our planet. The twisting veins of color that traverse his paintings imitate a topographic map in both their shapes and the highly worked physical painting surface. These colors and forms aptly describe the wild shades that appear in the extraordinary scenes he paints, ranging from feral sunsets to otherworldly nightscapes. He begins his paintings with personal photos, drawings, and found objects, many of which are from his time spent in the American west. In his paintings, he hopes to bring awareness to the contested and destructive interactions humans have had and continue to have with these irreplaceable landscapes.

About Sharpe-Walentas Studio Program

The Sharpe-Walentas Studio Program awards rent-free non-living studio space to 17 visual artists for year-long residencies in DUMBO, Brooklyn. Its mission is to provide working studio space and community for artists. Artists are selected annually based on merit from a competitive pool of applicants by a professional jury comprised of artists and members of the SWSP Artists Advisory Committee.

See on Google Maps



Kimo Nelson paints landscapes of remarkable geological features such as canyons and icebergs with methods that mimic their own formation. He layers, distresses, and removes multiple layers of paint in ways that imitate the erosion and accumulation that shape the rippling surfaces of our planet. The twisting veins of color that traverse his paintings imitate a topographic map in both their shapes and the highly worked physical painting surface. These colors and forms aptly describe the wild shades that appear in the extraordinary scenes he paints, ranging from feral sunsets to otherworldly nightscapes. He begins his paintings with personal photos, drawings, and found objects, many of which are from his time spent in the American west. In his paintings, he hopes to bring awareness to the contested and destructive interactions humans have had and continue to have with these irreplaceable landscapes.